Category Archives: Workbenches

Roman Legs: Four or Eight?

Today I turned the first four legs for the low Roman workbench but I left my lathe set up because I might need to turn four more tomorrow. While most images I’ve come across of Roman workbenches show them made … Continue reading

Posted in Roman Workbenches, Uncategorized, Workbenches | 15 Comments

Flattening the Roman Benchtop

I only want to work each surface of this benchtop once. The slab weighs enough (approximately 115 pounds) that I have to struggle with it to get it in and out of the vise and onto the benchtop. So every … Continue reading

Posted in Roman Workbenches, Uncategorized, Workbenches | 19 Comments

The Roman Workbench Begins

This afternoon I got a good start on my first Roman workbench – a knee-high bench with almost no workholding, aside from holes for pegs or holdfasts. I’m building it using a red oak top from Will Myers, who dried … Continue reading

Posted in Roman Workbenches, Uncategorized, Workbenches | 27 Comments

A Workbench Cleat from 1826

Check out the right leg of the workbench in this 1826 plate that Jeff Burks dug up from “Les Amusemens de la Campagne” (Vol. 3) by M.A. Paulin Desormeaux. Take a look at Fig. B there. It’s a small cleat … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, Workbenches | 2 Comments

Hulot’s ‘Twin Press’ for a Workbench

Five years after the 1770 publication of “L’ Art Des Expériences” by Jean-Antoine Nollet, came M. Hulot’s “L’art du tourneur mécanicien,” an influential book among turners especially. In it, Hulot describes a “twin press” for a workbench in some detail. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, Workbenches | 2 Comments

A 1572 Workbench from the Netherlands

I have a theory, which I’ll delve into in my next book, called “Roman Workbenches,” that the transition from the old-style Roman workbench to the more formally joined French or modern bench occurred in the 16th century. So I was … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, Workbenches | 9 Comments

A 1770 French Bench, and a Translation

Jeff Burks pointed out that the bench shown in this entry is indeed French and was copied in reverse for the German encyclopedia. But even more important, Burks offered this translation of the description of the bench from the French … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, Workbenches | 3 Comments