Category Archives: Handplanes

Grind the Iron & Fit the Chipbreaker: Part 3

When I fixed up my first jack plane in the 1990s, I took the advice of every decent person around me: I replaced its old iron with a new Hock blade. The replacement blade cost almost three times what I … Continue reading

Posted in Handplanes, Uncategorized | 36 Comments

The Jack Plane You Really Need: Part 1

For me, the jack plane is as essential as the hatchet is to a green woodworker. Or a drawknife is to a traditional chairmaker. The jack plane (sometimes called a fore plane) gets furniture parts to shape in a huge … Continue reading

Posted in Handplanes, Uncategorized | 54 Comments

The ‘Hard Reset’ for Handplanes

No matter how expensive or well-made your handplane is, there are times when you have to perform a “hard reset” on the tool when it starts to behave unpredictably. I use my handplanes every day, so I have to do … Continue reading

Posted in Handplanes | 24 Comments

‘Handplane Essentials’ Now Available in French

Thanks to the tireless work of woodworker Yann Facchin, my book “Handplane Essentials” has been translated into French and is now available for sale. You can read about the book and order it through the publisher’s website here. I recently … Continue reading

Posted in Handplanes, Uncategorized | 8 Comments

Level Tricky Corners with a Handplane

Many woodworkers struggle with leveling the front edges of a frameless cabinet. You have grain running at right angles all over the place. How do you get all the front edges flush without spelching the corners and also produce a … Continue reading

Posted in Handplanes, Uncategorized | 10 Comments

Steve Voigt on Cap Irons

The highlight of the Lie-Nielsen Hand Tool Event in Covington, Ky., last weekend was finally getting to meet planemaker Steve Voigt and try out his tools. His double-iron wooden-bodied planes are fantastic – nimble, responsive and quite well-made. They also … Continue reading

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Beware the Cat’s Face

When a flat-sawn board has reversing grain it will usually exhibit a swirling grain pattern on its faces or edges, warning you that it could be difficult to plane. I have always heard this swirl as being called a “cat’s … Continue reading

Posted in Handplanes, Lost Art Press Storefront, Uncategorized | 26 Comments