Author Archives: nrhiller

About nrhiller

cabinetmaker and author

The problem with passion

Originally posted on Making Things Work:
Note: This is the second in a series of posts related to the tales in Making Things Work. The posts are new material, not excerpted from the book, and some, such as this one,…

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Blame the Tuna

Originally posted on Making Things Work:
Note: This is the first in a series of posts related to the tales in Making Things Work. The posts are new material, not excerpted from the book. Each will be tied to one…

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Farmhouse Style

One of the kitchens among those in the book I’m writing for Lost Art Press is in a newly built house on a hilltop in a spectacular rural location. When the clients first contacted me about their kitchen, they described … Continue reading

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Two ways you can learn from my education in the school of hard knocks

For the past two years I’ve been posting at Fine Woodworking’s Pro’s Corner blog. Web producer Ben Strano’s invitation to write for the blog came shortly after the publication of Making Things Work, and while I don’t know whether the … Continue reading

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Who’s driving this bus? (with bonus features)

Originally posted on Making Things Work:
For the past few days I’ve been working on a hayrake table, and I’ve been fascinated by how differently the process is unfolding from the last time I built a table of this design.…

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Please let me focus

One comment on my last post moved me to respond. I struggle with the “women only” classes.. to exclude on the basis of being inclusive… is a difficult logic puzzle. While I recognize the issues of sexism and bias (overt and … Continue reading

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Three who make a difference

This weekend I went through the final proof of Marc Adams’s forthcoming book, The Difference Makers, to be published this summer by Lost Art Press. It’s a rich portfolio of work by 30 makers in diverse woodworking forms and styles. … Continue reading

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