Free Download: ‘Roman Workbenches’

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One of the things we strive to do at Lost Art Press is give away as much information as we possibly can, whilst still eating, sheltering and being (you’re welcome) fully clothed.

And so today we are offering my 2017 book “Roman Workbenches” as a free download. You don’t have to register, give us your email or type in some code at checkout. Heck, you don’t even have to prove you’re not a robot. Robots are welcome to download it as many times as they like (poor misbegotten robots).

All you have to do is click the link below, and the pdf will download to your computer or phone.

Roman Workbenches

“Roman Workbenches” was the precursor to “Ingenious Mechanicks,” my most recent book. “Roman Workbenches” explores the origins of the first-known Western workbench. “Ingenious Mechanicks” traces the development of the workbench through the 1600s.

We printed “Roman Workbenches” via letterpress, which was a crazy and fun experiment. It was a short press run. And the letterpress company, Steamwhistle, closed its doors shortly after publication. (It was not our fault, promise.) After we published “Ingenious Mechanicks,” the Roman book became somewhat of an orphan.

So we are inviting you to adopt it today – free of charge. It has its shots and is ready to go home with you.

— Christopher Schwarz

About Lost Art Press

Publisher of woodworking books and videos specializing in hand tool techniques.
This entry was posted in Ingenious Mechanicks, Roman Workbenches, Uncategorized, Workbenches. Bookmark the permalink.

42 Responses to Free Download: ‘Roman Workbenches’

  1. the Rusted TinMan says:

    THANK-YOU!

    Like

  2. hgordon4 says:

    That’s a shame about Steamwhistle. I just pulled my copy down off the shelf and was reminded I never glued in my two-line bottom of page 28 piece. 🙂

    Like

    • I’m not gluing it in. I’m leaving mine pristine, for some lucky collector 100 years from now.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ed says:

      Count me among Steamwhistle’s mourners. I ran a Heidelberg “Windmill” Letterpress at my father’s printing company summers and after school through high school and the first part of college. There were also two offset presses in the shop, but there were jobs that only the Heidelberg could do. It is a unique machine. If you’ve stood next to one that is running, you know what I mean. 🙂 Thank you for the download, Chris. I’m patiently waiting for the updated ADB and will keep working my way down my LAP wish list until then.

      Like

      • mallasch says:

        I’m with Ed. Some of my earliest and fondest memories was working in my Grandfather’s basement print shop where printer’s ink, love and a strong work ethic was instilled. He didn’t have a Heidelberg, but did have several Chandler & Price offset presses, many with few if no guards (all grandchildren retain all their digits thankyouverymuch G’pa for thorough training).

        And thank you for sharing the download, I’m afraid I count myself as a book addict so it gets read and used…

        Like

  3. Becky says:

    Thank You!

    Like

  4. Neatherywise says:

    Sweet! Thanks very much!

    Like

  5. Andrew Davidson says:

    Awesome. Thanks, I look forward to reading it.

    Like

  6. Michael Robertson says:

    Very cool offer! Truly a example of service and love of your crafts and customers!

    Like

  7. Laura Smith says:

    Wow that’s so generous I feel a twinge of guilt clicking download – thank you!

    Like

  8. Paul Murphy says:

    Thank you very much.

    Like

  9. I liked the original plan, when you were going to sell it as a kit we could bind ourselves. Bookbinding has long been on my list of things to learn.

    Like

  10. Andrew Sistrand says:

    Thanks, Christopher–very nice little book.

    Like

  11. Jeff Racy says:

    Thanks Chris for getting the info out there. We all prosper when the info is out there but it is what you do with that information that will set you apart from all others.

    Like

  12. Gary Roberts says:

    Thanks for making the book available! Looking forward to reading it.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. rockysstuff says:

    Chris, Thanks for sharing this very interesting read.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Hugo says:

    Damn… you are killing capitalism. Bravo to you! Sincerely, we are very lucky. Cordialement .

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Don says:

    Thanks!

    Like

  16. Aquila says:

    Thank you. I do appreciate this.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Thank you. That’s fascinating.

    Like

  18. Earl Miner says:

    Thanks much, very generous.

    Like

  19. Thank you on behalf of us with “learner/teacher” personality types… and who also buy all the Lost Art titles within our budget.

    Like

  20. Andy says:

    Thanks, Chris; this feels like a drink on the house. Much appreciated.

    Like

  21. Dan says:

    I’ve never considered storing chisels by just dropping them on the floor point down, but I guess if they’re sharp enough that would work pretty well. Those crafty Romans!

    Like

  22. Timothy says:

    Thank you!

    Like

  23. Jeff Simpson says:

    Thank you for this amazing gift.

    Like

  24. Evan W says:

    Thanks Chris!

    Like

  25. Glenn P. Kuffel says:

    Thank you for sharing. I enjoyed IM and look forward to this. The roman bench may be my next build.

    Like

  26. Steve Dixon says:

    Thanks a bunch. I making a tool trolley to follow me around my shop. Do you still use the angled leg vise in your Workbench book? How do you like the knock down bench fromPWW? Thanks Steve

    Like

  27. Rachael Boyd says:

    Hi there Chris thanks for the free book, I have decided to make it a hardbound book for my library
    , so I have been looking for a cover pic, did you have one that you were going to use if so where would I find it.. Thanks again for the freebee.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. John Sunnygard says:

    Thank you, Chris. After reading Ingenious Mechanicks, I cannot look at old benches, tables and chairs without crawling under then, sneaking my fingertips under the top and joints, and snapping a few discrete photos with my phone. During a recent business trip to Paris, my wife and I slipped down to Burgundy for a long weekend. It wasn’t the wine that had me crawling beneath the ancient village furniture. Thank you for helping put me in touch with the fine craftsman of d’antan!

    Liked by 2 people

  29. Chris Johnson says:

    Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Jamie says:

    What a delightful surprise. Reading this was such a pleasure.

    Thank you for the work you put into this, it was educational, informative, and funny.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Thank you Christopher.

    Like

  32. Martin Jones says:

    Thanks!
    And where should I look to get the text made into a proper “book”?

    Martin

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Steve Whatley says:

    Thank you! For the record, I would be willing to purchase a hard copy if one was available.
    Steve

    Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.