Images from the Cutting Room Floor

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To prevent “The Anarchist’s Design Book” from rivaling “War and Peace” in word count, I hatcheted a lot photos and words during the editing process. Some of the photos that I removed, however, might be interesting to those considering building some of the projects.

The staked dining table and worktable are probably my two favorite projects in the book, and yet they are so unusual that I’m afraid people might dismiss them. So here are a few alternative views of these projects from the book that might give you a better feel for what they look like “in the round.”

Also, there’s a good shot of the dining table with a tablecloth – which is how the table would have been typically used for eating.

— Christopher Schwarz

About Lost Art Press

Publisher of woodworking books and videos specializing in hand tool techniques.
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21 Responses to Images from the Cutting Room Floor

  1. Greg Merritt says:

    Thank you! These will go a long way in convincing management that I have NOT lost my mind. She has no vision…;)

  2. auswimkc says:

    My management too!

  3. pathdoc70 says:

    Chris, Thanks for the additional photos of the dining room table and work station as I have not yet read that far in the Anarchist’s Design Book. You have solved a problem for me in my home office renovation project as this is the exact table design that I have been trying to find. Simple, relatively easy build that looks good and is very functional. Sweet. It will allow me to rid myself of the large,clunky Sauder furniture-like
    desk I have in there now.
    Thanks for a the great design and book.
    Michael O’Brien
    Valley Head, AL

  4. Thanks for the extra photos, but no additional marketing of the work table was needed to win me over. I’ll be attempting a build of one of those before too long!

  5. Anthony Wilson says:

    The desk and chair combo is your best work Chris – furniture for life.

  6. g2-87cc707f0aa4e62f4a92f77f89ccba9d says:

    Such beautiful work and photographs

  7. Chris, the photo of the dining table with the table cloth is really striking – the addition of the cloth really emphasises the silhouette of the table. A wonderful piece.

    K

  8. Nice table…..looks to be perfectly flat…..but is there a reason the 3 boards have the rings oriented in the same direction?

  9. jfkriege says:

    The worktable is going to be my first project from the book, and this only reinforces it. It also has me thinking that a chair needs to follow in short order.

    My mind is pondering that chair with a few of the recent posts (here and instagram). There was a windsor chair, and then the tapered legs of the staked chair, and now this. I feel there may be a whole continuum between the windsor and the staked chair of ADB that needs exploring.

  10. Marty Backe says:

    I think these style of pictures would have served the book better. The published pictures for the staked piece are too ‘cold’ in their settings. These pictures are much more inviting to build. IMHO.

    I really like the desk.

  11. rushbycraig says:

    What wood species did you use?
    The dining table top looks like pine. The rest looks like something else.

  12. Ryan Starkey says:

    Beautiful pictures Chris. It must have been agonizing to decide which pics to keep in the book. Half through it by the way, Great read.

  13. But what is that threaded piece for on the big table?

  14. Eli says:

    I’m sure you go over this in the book, but is there any reason the paired legs on the dining table can’t be opposite each other, rather than on the same side? Wobble prevention?

  15. Bob Burch says:

    Don’t think I’ve anticipated a project this much since your Roubo bench build. The chairs look like Welch stick chairs, my fav!

  16. For some reason, I still can’t quite fall in love with the dining table. I think my eye craves symmetry too much. But I’ve loved the work table from the moment I first saw it – fast, functional, and attractive.

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