Category Archives: Furniture of Necessity

Revising the Seat

Today I’ve been sketching a new seat for the three-legged backstool. Here’s where we are at 3:59 p.m. and ready for a beer after a long day of editing. — Christopher Schwarz

Posted in Furniture of Necessity | 12 Comments

How I Evaluate My Own Work

If you put your work out on display, you will receive criticism. There’s the favorable: “Will you sell it to me?” And the not-so-good: “Wow, that is a nice piece of oak you used.” I’m used to it, and it … Continue reading

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The Unpredictable Backstool

The three-legged form of backstool is ideal for uneven or dirt floors, though it looks wrong at first to modern eyes, like a Zap Xebra three-wheeled car. Though we all know in our heads that a three-legged stool is stable, … Continue reading

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More Chairs of Necessity

Peter Follansbee, one of the authors of “Make a Joint Stool from a Tree,” dug up some photos of historical examples of chairs that Randle Holme drew in the 17th century. The photos of chairs are here. Peter also wrote … Continue reading

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Naked Necessity

Earlier this week, contributing editor Suzanne Ellison suggested a short Q&A on early seating furniture, which she has been helping me research for “The Furniture of Necessity.” I consented, as long as the interview was conducted nude. This is my … Continue reading

Posted in Furniture of Necessity | 26 Comments

The 17th-century World of Sitting

From Randle Holme III’s “Academy of Armory,” which he began in 1649. As republished in “Living and Working in Seventeenth Century England” Throne He beareth a Throne, a chair Royall, or a Cathedre (from it Latine terme), adorned with a … Continue reading

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Sandpaper and Shaved Legs

When I make early chairs, I prefer a surface finish for the legs and spindles that is faceted and created by shaving instead of turning. I also use sandpaper to help me see what I’m doing (he wrote, pausing and … Continue reading

Posted in Furniture of Necessity | 28 Comments